Django Django play their biggest London gig to date at one of the cities most well-known venues – The Roundhouse – which formerly served as a victorian railway shed.  The band’s set up for the night consist of many dazzling coloured lights that compliment their simple projection backdrop with interchanging graphics.  The sold out show is completely packed out with cheerful faces who have come down to watch.  A little after 9, the band take the stage kicking off their set with ‘Introduction’ from their self-titled debut album.

The band remain energetic on stage with each and every one of them jumping up and down non-stop throughout the set. They do not hold back on showing the audience how much fun they are having in their performance and exhibit no signs of fatigue throughout.  The band altogether are confident and coherent in their performance, although the vocals are a bit muffled— a problem observed with most performances at the venue. That aside, it is no surprise that the band put on a spectacular show, they have been relentlessly touring since the release of their latest album Born Under Saturn. 

The crowd are fully immersed in the set with many even attempting to mosh to their music, which was a tad unfitting seeing as the band have a more laid back indietronica sound.  The band are able to arrange their set so that they manage play all the crowd favourites including ‘First Light’ and ‘Shake and Tremble’. It is evident that the band strategically place songs across their set to build up their performance in the best possible way.  Frontman Vincent Neff, remained proactive in rallying the audience’s energy through asking them to wave their hands in the air and even got them to stomp the ground loudly in their set, creating an unbelievable atmosphere within the room. Despite the zestful performance, the band tone it down a lot more with their performance of ‘Love’s Dart’ in which an acoustic guitar was brought on stage. After a

Despite the zestful performance, the band tone it down a lot more with their performance of ‘Love’s Dart’ in which an acoustic guitar was brought on stage. After a well-constructed body of songs were performed including their song ‘Slow West’ that was made originally for a film starring Michael Fassbender, the band made their exit. However, it was clear that no one in the audience were at all ready to part with the band. The crowd chanted for the group to come back and play a few more numbers. To their delight, Django Django came back ever more vibrant than before putting on a tireless encore that comprised of ‘4,000 years’, ‘Pause Repeat’ ending on ‘Silver Rays’. They truly put on a colourful set not only reflected in their stage lighting but also in their resounding performance.